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of course. so trying to -- china is a much interest in canadian energy and natural resources. we are very much interested in building trust, strategic trust and cooperation with china. and from enable perspective, of course, i'll give you one sort of anecdote. you were referring to this the islands, two months ago i attended the western pacific naval symposium hosted -- and have the opportunity to sit between the deputy commander of the people's liberation army navy, and the commander of the ambassadors japanese maritime self-defense force, a euphemism for the japanese navy. it was at a time when the island was leading on cnn and bbc. i thought as i was sitting between two them there's an opportunity for a canadian to do something extraordinary from an naval diplomatic perspective and put this thing to bed. [laughter] >> how did that go? >> not too well, not too well. [laughter] which is my point. i spoke with the chinese admirals interpreter. i spoke with admiral commander in english, a great conversation. but never was the bridge build or even considered. and i think one of the key issu
.5%. a representative of the chinese academy of social sciences said the economy will grow 7.7%. >> translator: china's exports are slowing because of the european debt crisis and the global economic slow down. >> li said economy bottomed out in the july through september quarter. the country's consumption and industrial output improved in september and october. he predicts growth will rebound next year to about 8.2%. he said increased public investment and more monetary easing would spur the economy. but li called for flexible government policies if the situation in europe gets worse. >>> the new leader of the chooeds communist party is sending out mixed signals. xi jinping says he wants to pursue a peaceful foreign policy. at the same time, china is locked in territorial disputes with japan and several southeast asian nations over islands in the east and south china seas. xi told a group of foreign academics in beijing that china poses neither a challenge nor a threat. >> translator: looking at china's history, cultural traditions, and current conditions, china will never adopt a policy of dominanc
will look at the new communist party of leadership in china and that impact on u.s.- china relations. hosted by the center for strategic and international studies in washington, this is an hour. i'd also like to recognize former ambassador to china jim sasser who's sitting right there, one of my close friends. thank you for coming, senator. glad to see you. well, the panel is a really good one, kurt campbell, assistant secretary of state for east asia and pacific affairs. he became -- came to that job in 2009, previously the ceo and co- founder of the center for a new american security. he was a professor at harvard, associate professor of public policy and international relations at the kennedy school. chris johnson, senior adviser and freeman chair in china studies here at csis. his most important public service, as far as i'm concerned, is he gave me a lot of help in preparing for the presidential debate. and i'll be -- always be grateful for that, chris. he's frequently advised senior white house, cabinet, congressional, military and foreign officials on chinese leadership and on beijing
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
hard currency on the open market. >> and though the soviet empire is a thing of the past, china is echoing the aspirations of its predecessor. >> there's no question that we're going to face a very serious challenge in the years to come, dealing with a rising china that wants to be dominant and hegemonic in its own region, wants to control sea lines of communication, wants to control the south china sea. and we have allies who stand to lose from that and look to us for support. i think that's the likeliest area of actual conflict. >> the pentagon will often say and right now the u.s. spends something like 4, 5, 6 times what china spends on its defense spending. and the big question then becomes what is china's intention? (instrumental music) >> in a national call to arms defense secretary leon panetta warned the threat of a significant cyber attack against america is already here. >> the collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> what are the threats american's face in this century? with the attacks of september 11th, the u.s. has had to comple
-wage china when he was on the board of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: looking around here live at the scene at the capitol, you have teachers who took the day off from school to demonstrate. you have united auto workers. we saw several big trucks from the teamsters. a lot of people sympathetic to efforts of these workers out here making their voices heard, expressing their discontent with what has happened. governor snyder told me a short time ago this is in response to a ballot initiative you remember failed in november. that was proposition 2. it would have put collective bargaining in the michigan constitution. it would have made it untouchable by any kind of new legislation. that is part of the complaint from the democrats. they say it is politics and retribution. also the complaint you hear from democrats it happened so fast. it happened without the public having time for input. what you see on the lawn is something governor snyder referenced f there wasn't enough time for public input you wouldn't have all
. >>> japanese auto parts makers are trying to find new business channels at a major trade fair in china. they're struggling to survive in the world's biggest car market amid souring relations between the two countries. 30 japanese suppliers are among 4,000-plus companies from around the world showcasing products and services in the fair that started obtuse. chinese consumers are shunning japanese products since a bilateral territorial dispute broke out in september. some have seen sales plunge in china by half. others remain unable to keep plants going. >> translator: i think the chinese market has big potential. we're pinning our hopes on china, being able to keep staying afloat. >> japanese officials making active sales pitches at the fair to potential clients in the u.s., europe, and china. >>> the nobel prize winner is eager to get back to work. >> he shared this year's nobel prize in physiology or medicine with a british scientist. his family joined him at the ceremony in stockholm. >> he received the award for his work with stem cells. >>> japanese children are scoring better in math a
india and china to develop into a completely distinct world civilizations without having much to do with each other for long-term history. let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly simple geographic place with all of these natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that l
counterterrorism, and then the u.s. ambassador to china, gary locke, on the relationship between the two countries. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every other family up here. probably never happen again in history. and it's interesting because after dad was sworn in, we went and took a picture, photo of the family, behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia, suburbia, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had been living there dad was vice president. and i'll never forget. that night mom is cooking dinner. literally, we're sitting around the dinner table, and mom is cooking dinner, and she looked over at my dad and goes, gerry, something is wrong here. you just became president of the united states and i'm still cooking. >> steve ford, linda johnson robb, and j
with modest gains. europe holding onto gains and china up nearly 3% over night as shanghai catches a break. our road map begins with a $20 billion deal. freeport mcmoran getting into the energy business making two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's
demand there, and exports to china fell 14.5%. chinese consumers are shying away from japanese goods due to ongoing territorial dispute. >>> japanese university students are busy trying to land a job in an economy that's not proving that welcoming. the japanese firms hire them en masse before they graduate. and third-year students started their job hunting in earnest this month. before most looked for jobs at big firms, but that may be changing. nhk world's shio tanaga tells us more. >> reporter: more than 100 students crowded into this recruitment seminar in tokyo. the company publishes free magazines an has only about 400 employees. until recently small firms such as this one often struggled to attract any students to seminars at this university. nami kitajima has been looking for sales work. she says she doesn't care about the size or fame of the company. >> translator: i'm not looking at how big the firm is. the issue is whether i can gro personally through the company. >> reporter: traditionally, most students have tried to land jobs at leading firms. the belief was that those compa
. >> excellent news out of china. pmi is an index or the ask people how confident you are feeling, indicating the fourth quarter of the year, china has seen a very marked pickup in economic growth. that is extremely good news because china had been having a pretty sluggish time of things over the course of the first half of 2012. this is leading the optimism that 2013 could break away from the economic doldrums. nonetheless [indiscernible] >> there you go. thank you very much. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton is receiving treatment at a hospital in new york for a blood clot. she suffered a concussion earlier this month after fainting and falling down. the blood clot was discovered during a follow-up medical examination rea. >> hillary clinton earlier this month. it is believed it was while on her trip to europe that the u.s. secretary of state contracted a stomach virus that left her severely dehydrated. on her return home, she collapsed and severed a concussion. during a follow-up examination, doctors have discovered a blood clot. mrs. clinton is being kept under observation in this b
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
will find out how it is changing china. is the season to engage in psychological warfare. and least, that is the accusation being made by north korea against its neighbors to the south, and it has to do with a christmas tree just west of seoul, korea, and the problem is that can be seen miles away in north korea. the north has threatened to the south with retaliation but has not said how exactly. children in one town have been given their christmas presents by elephant at their school. they enjoy the festivities. it is a regular feature of the town, but it was canceled because of flooding. now, when would you need an ax to go swimming? well, here is one example. this is north of the capital of berlin. they were breaking up the ice and then taking a dip. you are watching "bbc world news." these are our headlines. two firefighters have been killed and another wounded in new york state. it happened as they responded to a blaze. an aide to advisor has been killed in afghanistan, the first killing of its kind, shot by a woman in police uniform. and another six police dead. it is now more
to china's extravaganza. most charismatic, pat? >> rg3. redskin rookie of the nfl. maybe mvp. has set this city on fire. >> marco rubio. senator from florida whose articulate to the point of almost being dem ogic. . but he is a riveting speaker and he has a future. >> are you afraid of him. >> no. i just pointed out his attributes. >> he is richly republican. you know that? >> right. but the democrats have their bench, too. >> i mean, after that, you know, the democrats still going to embrace you? >> i still think that bill clinton's speech at the democratic convention was the most exciting moment of that convention. turned around the whole convention and once again revealed the great talents of bill clinton. >> does he save it? >> you are showing your brilliance again. >> i absolutely agree. a better job than barack obama did. >> i want to add to the clinton tribute. the most charismatic bill clinton. for stellar performance of the democratic national convention. his 40 minute speech was critical for a second term for barack obama. it redefined the global economic crisis. he describ
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
'm with the "world journal" could you address the growing chinese assertivenesses the south china sea and the east china sea -- the foreign ships are going territorial waters. so are you going participate in the coming events? and what can that message -- [inaudible] thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course, the issues that are being faced today in the south china sea and other areas in the north and central east asia, i think are complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes. some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and i think, to some degree has motivated some of the activities you see seeing there. the u.s. position, as you know, we don't take sides on territorial dispute. there's many of those around the globe not just around the south china sea. we want them resolved peacefully, without coerce. and that we call on all the parties there including the chinese to ensure that as the approach the problems they do so in a way that avoids con flict within that avoids miscalculation, that using the vehicles a
for its missile program in china. we know they buy things for their gas centrifuge program in china. some things are made in germany. probably made in the u.s. china has been a major gap in this whole system. on sanctions and north korea could face tougher action from china might constrict some of its ability to buy things that it absolutely needs for its nuclear programs. jon: you think it is likely american-made technology is helping north korea with its missile program? >> could be. i don't know the missile program nearly as well as the nuclear but what north korea does, it uses china a sense as a transshipment point because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been m
.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region. this is a half-hour. >> well, good morning and allow hot. i am glad to be here to talk to you about the pacific command, where we are today to where we see ourselves heading in the future. since the last time i was here, we continue to move forward on the rebalanced initiative after as directed by president obama. the rebalanced rows on the strengths of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yeste
is at the center of dispute with china. china has reacted with alarm. beijing declared itself "ready to work with japan" and they expressed disquiet. >> the former prime minister vowed to put the japanese economy back on track after years of deflation made worse by a soaring currency that has squeezed japanese exporters. >> a landslide victory for the conservative ldp party. voters are putting their trust in his promise to get the economy back on track. >> the mission we have been given is to beat inflation and deal with the high yen and wall dealing with the economy and working to create more jobs. >> many voters were critical over the handling of the devastating earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster. they say it was last eight support rather than a rejection of the outgoing premier. >> politics is all about the results. we have to take responsibility. the cause of this major defeat lies with me, as the leader of this party. i hereby take these results seriously and i will resign as the leader of the democratic party in japan. what's the future of the japanese power plants was not a big
. typically any ballistic missile parts would fly through china to the north. china is north korea's only friend. there have been reports of voice of america this week that iranian team was seen in north korea, in recent days. there are questions tonight as to whether the iranians helped or benefited from this north korean ballistic missile launch. >> shepard: jennifer griffin, thanks. from the pentagon. just released fox news poll finds most americans think the government is broken. but some fresh hope tonight that our leaders can get things together in time to keep us from going over the fiscal cliff. we'll show you what is driving the optimism. there is quite a bit of it. plus, possible break in case of the manhattan murder. days after somebody carried out apparent execution on the sidewalk. police found a very important clue miles from the scene. it could help them track down the killer. they need some help. so we'll show you with the help of journalists on fox news with this wednesday "fox report." our new maine stays! 15entrees under $15, seafood, chicken and more! oothe tilapiawith
don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes there's a possibly in the future they are wondering why it isn't happening more quickly. >> so why are china, india, pakistan -- why are they where they are economically if they are on the cusp? what is going not right in those countries that's growing right here in the united states? >> pakistan doesn't have the momentum so they are in a different category. >> brazil, take brazil. >> again, the thing that constrains growth in every country and the symbol -- which i do and i go to places like the world bank and if i am invited to share my thoughts with folks that work on policy issues mayor and the same thing in the united st
to pyongyang. press articles hail the fact that china in anticipation of the recent launch had begun inspecting cargo on north korean ships in search of contraband. the question this raises is why has chi gnat not been inspecting north korean ships since 2006 as called for in a u.n. resolution, reinforced by another resolution in 2009. if u.n. member states would only enforce the sanctions currently on the books, north korea would be unable to ignore the swer national community and the civilized world. the time for coordinated international action is now. the time, in fact, is long overdue. with that, mr. speakering i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the squom from florida reserves. the gentleman from california, mr. berman is recognized. mr. berman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.con.res. 145 as amended and yield myself such time as i may consume. sproy the gentleman is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threa
. ultimately it helped to work. a lot of people supported that. people say, apple, they do business in china. these workers are virtually slaves. i will never own the stock. if that is the case they missed out on an investment unless they bought two weeks ago, an investment of a lifetime. so where do you find the way to draw the line? i've got to tell you something, this thing is urban outfitters is more reflective of society, not a company of really the have garrity in society today amongst young people is at the point where i talk about this all the time. i think pendulum has swung so far it can't get much further. lori: do you the think the stock surge up 34% year-to-date, urban outfitters because of shocking nature of stuff? kids in way to rebel and spicy putting it as nicely as i can? what is going on with the store that is generating interest? >> they are ahead of the curve. real hip store called supreme. they have a location in l.a. and soho. urban bought them. it was a brilliant move. this was underground success. they sell it throughout everywhere. it is a real smart retail play. i
in medical equipment to russia in 2011, but we face strong competition from china, which increased its share of the russian market in each of the last ten years. mr. president, we don't shy away from strong competition, but we want that competition to be able to be played out on an even playing field. and as long as we don't have normal permanent trade relations with russia, we're disadvantaging ourselves. it simply doesn't make sense. russia has agreed he, since joining the w.t.o., russia agreed to reduce average tariffs on medical equipment to 4.3% and to cut its top tariffs from 15% down to 7%. as it stands now, that is a benefit that china will get, and we will not. it simply doesn't make sense to anybody. to grant russia pntr status requires us to repeal the 1974 jackson-vanik amendment. a lot of our staff members, i hasten to say, were not even born back when jackson-vanik was put in place. and many of our colleagues and a lot of our staff have studied the soviet union but have never really experienced that period of time, and what we're living with is a complete and total relic of a b
of nokia. it announced an exclusive deal with china mobile, the world's largest mobile-phone services provider. they have more than 700 million subscribers. >> let's take a quick look at some market numbers. the dax ended the day at about -- up about 1/4 of 1%. euro stoxx 50 closed just a a tad up. -- just a tad up. the dow jones is at 13,076. the euro is trading at 1.3079. >> un generate -- un secretary general ban ki-moon is calling on nations to come to an agreement about how to stop global warming. he made those comments at the climate talks in qatar. and he is trying to break a deadlock between the countries who are attending. >> our reporter has been talking to some delegates. >> at a climate summit press conference in doha, indian -- this indian spiritual leader described the effects of climate change in the himalayas. he says melting glaciers and a loss of bio-diversity are signs that the world cannot ignore, signs that drove him to do more to help the environment. >> giving the blessings to the people and healing that is not enough. i have to do more. the whole world is suffe
approach to this, and governor romney's statement labeling china a currency manipulator on day 1 suggests taking a tougher alignment with china may be an issue, is worth pursuing. we will see not an enormous change but probably a check up in preparation and confrontation, oversight. >> anyone else? >> i suspect on detention policy we won't see a lot of change. we did not see a lot of change from the bush and administration to the obama administration, the obama administration argued that the protection should not extend to the circuits, congress wanted to keep the courts out more than they have when they passed the military detention acts and everything else in 2006 and tried to correct for what they saw as the court trying to extend jurisdiction, they have established a line, i do not see they can't push back against that line and the battle lines that performed at this point. >> i basically agree with greg the obama administration continued, without any change whatsoever. and on the ground, on the question, with new detainee's, the legacy cases are not going anywhere. governor romney wo
. the next five years will be telling for the ruling party. >> more than 1000 people in china have signed a business -- a petition where people -- it is part of an effort to tackle corruption in the government. while less as if elected -- there is a growing debate in israel over the use of pesticides in some of the country's favorite foods. a survey has found high levels of residue in more than 100 types of produce. james ferguson has the story from jerusalem. >> -- james ferguson has the story from jerusalem. >> israelis in fresh and local but how healthy are these foods? in recent government study has called hadi has caused some alarm. >> there are people that tackle these issues seriously and start to grow something which -- it should hand -- it should not happen to a thing like this. >> the study of pesticide residues in 56 of -- 56 percent of the foods, there are higher levels than permitted. there is possible exposure to pesticide use in farmington abutting quantities within the range of risk. others say the longer-term effects are potentially harmful. >> there have been studies in
the factory and move to china? i would guess probably non. close to zero. what of thought, that the workers who had to live with a factory that closes, live in a community that will be affected by factories the close, and workers themselves make the decision. here is another one. for chris decide what to do with the profits, here's an interesting thing we expect. over the last 30 years with boards of directors, we have noticed something i am sure you have all noticed, the boards of directors decided to use the profits they were earning to give enormous increases in the salaries to top executives. we are famous in america for that. thee aratio of one executive ge to an average worker is 300 to 40s all other countries. so we have been in a major part of the ineq0 lity that i talked about before that has grown up in 30 years comes out of the decisions made in the boardroom with the boards of directors and mothor shareholders about the profits. if the workers themseffeces distributed the profits collectively, would they give poor people $4s every body else says not enough? unlikely. the biggest
. >> >>> more american jobs than ever depend on investment from china. we're going to go to california this morning where the chinese are finding bargains they can't pass up on "cbs this morning." "this is george. he is a good little monkey and always very curious. one day george got an important letter. he's built a rocket ship to travel into space." google, how far is earth to the moon? the moon is 238,900 miles... "the great moment had come." 3, 2, 1... [ giggling ] up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app allows you to quickly calculate your mortgage payment based on today's incredibly low interest rates... right from your iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ♪ ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as str
and secondly which could be more important the recovery in china for industrial production steel consumption and that would help. ashley: nat gas was so cheap it was ridiculous and actually killed coal but those prices have come up a little bit now. >> if we get a normal winter that will increase the amount of natural gas consumed, increase the amount of electricity. the winter got off probably slower start than i think most bulls would have liked to have seen, it is picking up as well and i think that will be helpful. ashley: you're mainly bullish because the demand for u.s. coal abroad. you mentioned china, that's probably our biggest customer, i would imagine. there are different types of coal. i don't want to get too technical. >> there's two types of coal -- coal, coal used to make electricity and the coal we sell to european asian latin american utilities, that we expect to increase the demand from the rest of the world. secondly the steel making coal which is used in europe brazil and in asia and we are one of the top three exporters of that coal in the world, and as the recovery in s
. if you look at the facts, 32% of our manufacturing base has been gutted and sold to china, india, any foreign country that has cheap labor. the top patriotic american companies are parking their profits and offshore accounts so they do not have to pay a fair share of their taxes. the bottom line is since the late '70s, the wealthiest 2% in this country are making 25 times their wealth that they made a black -- back then. there are only paying 40% more in taxes. this country is doomed if we do not start putting terrace of the imports coming into this country. the republican party is selling you an outright lie. thank you. host: let's show you a facebook posting. the economist and professor at the university of maryland will be with us and about 25 minutes or so. he will take your calls and give you his economic outlook for 2013. he has written a lot on the matter. from west virginia, independent. caller: is, sir. i would just like to say that i am not very optimistic above the future of the united states right now. we are in so much that it is pathetic. our budget is way over. this pre
as china with the issue of human rights. as long as the international community does not address the interests of the importance stakeholders, that is not really going to help. what is your take on that? >> i think they have very short form policy. i have been in moscow and we met with the russian minister of foreign affairs. syria and russia have a relationship. we need to keep such a relationship, but with such short policies by defending the assad regime, you of making such a relationship very difficult. i think the syrians see russia the same as they see the assad regime. when you see your brother and sister being killed every day -- i have been in syria and i have lots of examples. when the syrian people solve all of this happen for them, of course, they will change their position on russia. i think for russia to keep their ambassador, it is difficult to keep him in damascus. any government in the future, they will put their relationship with russia and iran as a priority. there are many voices within the opposition, and the syrian government should be open to negotiations a
with this, the british, the french, the germans, russia, china, they all tend to view this as a proliferation problem. the conversation between iran and the other side tends to be about that issue, very narrowly focused. to kind of move that conversation, you have to figure out a different kind of architecture. the five plus one process, as such, is designed to deal with the corporation issue and the composition is that has to do with the iranian violation of the mpt and there have been 62 -- six security council resolutions that suggests sanctions. there are two countries who suggest that the issue between -- that this is not a proliferation issue but has to do with the character of the regime and one of them is israel who does not view this as strictly an arms dispute and the second one is iran who similarly suggests that although it is an arms control issue, they are really using arms control as a way to undermine the regime. there are two actors in this particular conflagration who are not accepting the argument being that this is about nuclear infractions as oppo
not create any jobs. as far as china is concerned we do not hit that high of a tariff on their imports. i believe it is a lot higher. the whole thing was steve jobs. he treated the apple computer in his garage. when he got successful theme of his company over to china giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he would not even be able to create the apple computer. we just do not do enough for the people of this country. the people who are position to create jobs do not reinvest in the country. i do not think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giant tax breaks given to those who want to invest in the country and create jobs. for a lower than the american businessmen. guest: i understand your frustration. part of it is the corporate tax .ode clearly needs to fix it a lot talk about fixing a and a revenue neutral way. it does not help lowering future deficits any easier. there are some things need to change. in general we need to realize that if we set our country on the bike path making the right investments in -- the right path making investme
panels in the world in china, also bought one of the solar panels. so they have brought a lot of money in for that small college. we need to have consistency in america and committing ourselves to preserving the environment, protecting us from global warming which is real and we need leadership coming from the white house every day saying we need to do something about global warming. that hasn't happened yet. my hope is in president obama's second term he'll be the leader of the world and not lagging behind the other nations in doing something about global warming. >> you're a nuclear engineer at one point, promoted nuclear energy. how do you make the distinction between nuclear energy for good use, good purposes, and for bad use? and iran's argument that they are creating nuclear energy for power and not as a threat to the united states, speak to the link between energy and national security. >> i was in charge of a development of the second atomic submarine and i was an early nuclear physicist. that was my graduate work. i had what's convinced then and now nuclear power for peaceful
in china where they claim to encounter racism unparalleled in any part of the world they had gone to. irritatingly stayed in branches of the ymca, the equivalent for grown men of the boy scouts and they were cheered on by enclaves of indians and especially -- the constant stated the dias pro-for the most of the globe remarkably a consequence of empire and counterweights to it. a different diaspora and yet similar manifestation of the internationalism supported -- in this clutch of circumnavigate errors, this international on his slightly later surface to her of the world. he came from a privileged russian family but that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that country's revolution. as a white russian stranded in china the man without a country so destitute that he made his way to shanghai overland and a mix of men's and women's clothing. in shanghai he obtained passports, documents of the league of nations have begun to issue to stateless refugees initially russians in 1922. a first step in the development of international refugee
working actively in china to buy european- american-chinese goods. the government is not completed, but they're not doing enough. we're thinking that pressure needs to be brought on china. goods made in germany, sold by that company to the chinese company that thinks it will keep it in china, but in fact it is going to iran. all it a country of tr concern. we're thinking maybe it is time that china is called out on that. china needs to be pressured to stop a local in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from outfitting its centrifuge program. that effort over time has had tremendous success. with more and more sanctions, it is been more successful. more purchases stopped, more interdiction's, more trouble for iran to make progress. >> in terms of u.s. non- proliferation programs, david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist, particularly in controls and lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation. what is your assessment of non- proliferation programs? >> when you hear discussions on sanctions, these are the things we tried to do to cut off s
. >> now, competing with china is not easy when wages there are $15 a day for assembly line worker. consultant says rising cost in china will create a tipping point allowing the u.s. to add 2 to 3 million manufacturing jobs in sections like furniture, fabricated metals and electronics over the next few years. the average american worker is 35% cheaper than the comparable work in western uranium. several companies electrolux, bridgestone are going to expand in the u.s. in addition to the reputation we already have quality in during row goods aerospace or experts hope at least this will trickle down jamie into consumer goods as well. back to you. >> jamie: made in the u.s.a. means jobs. thanks, william. tens of thousands of americans are celebrating christmas a long way from home. we can't forget our troops who are spending the holiday in afghanistan. more on them coming up. plus, there is no word from the pentagon that the u.s. military will soon be sending teams to africa. also later, prayers for peace in syria. the latest round of bloody bombings killing innocent men, women and ch
your report opens up. a tragic tale of a legal immigrant to this country from china, she was brutally attacked by an illegal immigrant from china, and after chen served his prison term, china refused to take him back. what happened? >> immigration officials in texas let him out more than once, and no point did they ever warn ms. wu this is a wider issue in the immigrant question. that's secrecy. they don't tell the public very much unlike the criminal system who they arrest, who they detain, and what happens to them in the case of ms. wu, she thought the man who brutally attacked her was in china and one day, three years later, he walks through her door and shortly after that kills her. >> why is this happening? why do we have no dodknowledge it? >> the immigration system says they are a civil immigration agency, they detain people they treat like criminals whether they have a record or not and they said that they believe that this is a private matter, that they need to protect the immigrants's privacy. so when we request the name of criminals, they said that the public interest in th
would be short yen and long japanese stocks. >> people watching not just january but china. ir ir ir iron oar a lot. >> let's get more insight from steve from web bush securities. how much of a nail biter is this for you in terms of fiscal cliff and the markets? >> i think pretty clear at this point that if there's a deal coming, it's gonna be coming very, very soon. i think the markets discounted the fact we are going to get some sort of deal t has held up fairly well here and i think if we don't get a deal, we will see a selloff. i don't know how considerable, but certainly see the 2, 3% decline in the market. >> does it amaze you, steve, that the markets, in your view, still consider a given that we are going to reach a deal? here we are thursday, december 27th. they still haven't issued a 48-hur notice for congress to return to capitol hill and yet you're saying the markets have baked in some sort of deal? >> yeah, i think so. i don't in he isly think the deal happened december 31st. if we pass waite without a deal earthquake the market will think something is going to happen in
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
then we got regulation in china. in 1911 in the u.s. we had the triangle shirt waist fire that led to deaths and that wound up giving us more regulations. sometimes regulation saves lives. remember that the next time you see the anti-regulatory fever that you see so many other places on television. all right let's bring in teresa hahn the director of a labor rights organization, and they were the ones conducting investigations of working conditions in factories around the globe. teresa, do you have a sense of when walmart said those are too expensive, we can't do it. how true or untrue is that relative to their cost? is it really that would be prohibitively expensive or a regular course of business? >> it's something that walmart absolutely has the financial ability to do and could do it for a relatively small part of their overall finances. it's a matter of political will in walmart and the companies are not willing to put forward to them what is a relatively small amount of money that would ultimately save the lives of hundreds if not thousands of their workers for their supplier
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